Native American

Articles
Quote banners( Politics)
Quote banners (Spirituality)
Catholic Priest child abuse
Native American Spirituality
Native American genocide
Canadian Holocaust
American Indian Movement (AIM)
60,000 Americans coercively sterilized
White missionaries
Leonard Peltier

Russell Means
Navajo Nation
Lakotah
Four Corners lung disease
Thanksgiving

The Truth About Hair and why Indians would keep their hair long

Native American tobacco helps smokers kick the habit and repair their lungs

Where White Man Went Wrong

Quanah Parker
Geronimo

Quotes
Don Juan

You can't wake someone who is pretending to be asleep.--Native American Proverb

"White man goes into his churches to talk about Jesus, the Indian into his Tepee to talk to Jesus (with Peyote etc)."--Quanah Parker

"Prescott Bush, George W's grandfather, and a band of Bonesmen, robbed the grave of Geronimo, took the skull and some personal relics of the Apache chief and brought them back to the tomb," says Robbins. "There is still a glass case, Bonesmen tell me, within the tomb that displays a skull that they all refer to as Geronimo." http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2003/10/02/60minutes/main576332.shtml

“The Sioux (aka Lakota) Indians of Minnesota must be exterminated or driven forever beyond the borders of the state.” – Minnesota Governor Alexander Ramsey

Products
Dogmocassins - Gloves for your feet!
Indian Maid Products Inc

Books
[2012] IN THEIR OWN WORDS—NATIVE AMERICAN VOICE OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION by Alan Fitzpatrick

[1881] A Century of Dishonor by Helen Hunt Jackson

News
CENSORED NEWS Indigenous Peoples and Human Rights
Indian Country Today Media Network.com


A product of U.S. Army-sanctioned mass slaughter of American bison in the 1800s, these bison skulls are waiting to be ground for fertilizer, most likely in the American midwest. The slaughter was so “effective” that the population of bison in the U.S. is estimated to have dropped from around 60 million in 1800 to as few as 750 in 1890.


Chief Little Wound with his wife and son. (1899 Heyn Photo)

[2006] Nanyehi - Nancy Ward - The last of the Ghigua. My Cherokee (Nanyehi) Lineage by Mary Sutherland The Cherokee were a matriarch society, where the women were equal to the men. Clan kinship followed the mother's side of the family. The children grew up in the mother's house, and it was the duty of an uncle on the mother's side to teach the boys how to hunt, fish, and perform certain tribal duties. The women owned the houses and their furnishings. Marriages were carefully negotiated, but if a woman decided to divorce her spouse, she simply placed his belongings outside the house.... In the Cherokee society , your Clan was your family. Children belonged to the entire Clan, and when orphaned were simply taken into a different household. Marriages were often short term, and there was no punishment for divorce or adultery. Cherokee women were free to marry traders, surveyors, and soldiers, as well as their own tribesmen. Cherokee girls learned by example how to be warriors and healers.

“Before our white brothers arrived to make us civilized men, we didn’t have any kind of prison. Because of this, we had no delinquents. Without a prison, there can be no delinquents. We had no locks nor keys and therefore among us there were no thieves.When someone was so poor that he couldn’t afford a horse, a tent or a blanket, he would, in that case, receive it all as a gift. We were too uncivilized to give great importance to private property. We didn’t know any kind of money and consequently, the value of a human being was not determined by his wealth. We had no written laws laid down, no lawyers, no politicians, therefore we were not able to cheat and swindle one another.We were really in bad shape before the white men arrived and I don’t know how to explain how we were able to manage without these fundamental things that (so they tell us) are so necessary for a civilized society.” - John (Fire) Lame Deer, Sioux Lakota, 1903-1976.”  Open Your Eyes

 


Piegan man and woman by a river. Montana. 1912. Photo by Roland W. Reed with hand-coloring by JoHannas Anderson.