Salomon Morel
[back] Swietochlowice camp

[Commandant of Swietochlowice which was set up by the Soviet NKVD - forerunner of the KGB - after the Red Army's liberation of southern Poland. The camp was later handed over to the Polish secret service, the notorious UB.]Salomon Morel, passport photo taken in 1993. Morel was accused of war crimes and crimes against humanity

[1998] Israelis Protect Concentration Camp Boss

[1993] The Commandant

[1994] Poles Review Postwar Treatment of Germans

Corroboration

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Quotes
Swietochlowice was set up by the Soviet NKVD - forerunner of the KGB - after the Red Army's liberation of southern Poland. The camp was later handed over to the Polish secret service, the notorious UB.  Stalin's policy was to put Jews in charge of camps. Their experiences during the Nazi Holocaust would mean that Germans and Poles held there could expect little mercy. More than half of the 3,000 prisoners at Swietochlowice were murdered or died there, according to PAP. [1998] Israelis Protect Concentration Camp Boss

In May, 1995, after a six-year investigation, the Provincial Commission (in Katowice) for the Investigation of Crimes Against the Polish Nation, reported on the concentration camp at Swietochlowice, first reported in An Eye for an Eye.  The Commission said,
    "The camp commander, Salomon Morel, was undoubtedly responsible for not preventing the mass deaths of at least 1,583 people. No matter what they were detained for, the use against them of methods resembling those used in the concentration camps by the Nazis isnít acceptable. These were extermination methods. For them, the full responsibility rests with Salomon Morel, who not only didnít prevent them but who personally used them." Corroboration

Dorota Boriczek, a camp survivor, remembers Salomon Morel as a barbaric and cruel man who, with his colleagues, was responsible for many killings of inmates. "I knew Morel in the camp. He was a very brutal man. He was young then. He would come in at night. We could hear the cries of the men then. They would beat them and throw the bodies out of the window," Mrs Boriczek, now 68 andliving in Ludswigberg, Germany, told The Independent. [1998] Israelis Protect Concentration Camp Boss